Roast Sirloin of Beef on the Bone

| October 6, 2010 | 1 Comment

King James I Favourite:

Legend has it that King James I on his way to Scotland stopped at an inn just outside Preston, where he was served roast loin of beef.  He enjoyed this so much that he withdrew his sword for its sheaf and knighted it ‘Sir Loin’

The reality is that this is probably just a myth, but it does make a great story!

I recently cooked this fantastic loin of beef on the bone, and was just as impressed as James I !

The joint you see weighs about 10lb (4.5kg). This is off one of our local grass fed Aberdeen Angus cross heifers, and would cost in the region of £70-£80, so I realise that it is not an everyday meal.  However, for a special occasion, this is an impressive cut to have on the sideboard.

You can see the creamy/white fat shows that it’s been fed on lots of good summer grass.
The bone needs to be chined so that it can be removed for easy carving. Real butchers will know how to do this. Here you can see the sirloin and the fillet with the t-bone down the centre.
Place in a roasting tin in a bed of onions.
Put the loin in the oven for 45 minutes at a hot heat (about 220C) and it will look almost cooked but really is just searing on the edge.
After 45 minutes reduce the temperature to 160C and cook for a further 1½ hours (approximately)

We are looking for the internal temperature, the coolest part to be about 50C. Digital thermometers are fantastic for this!

This took just short of 2 hours.
Put it on a wooden cutting board and cover with foil and a towel and let it rest for anything up to an hour. One hour later the Yorkshire Puddings are ready, using the fat from the roast joint. The temperature has actually increased now up to 60oc which is barely pink, as the heat distributes more evenly.
Start by removing the fillet steak from the underneath and the chine bone at the back which allows us to carve easily.
Slice a piece of sirloin and a piece of fillet for each guest.
Perfectly cooked beef, slightly pink, crispy fat, fantastic flavour!
This piece of beef fed 6 big portions and a further 8 servings over the following days for sandwiches and reheated beef, and one final serving for the dog.

Category: Recipes

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  1. Kevin says:

    It’s actually french. Sur meaning “on”, as in “on the loin”.

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